Theory-Based Approaches to Support Dermoscopic Image Interpretation Education: A Review of the Literature

Theory-Based Approaches to Support Dermoscopic Image Interpretation Education: A Review of the Literature

Authors

  • Tiffaney Tran The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Niels K. Ternov Herlev Hospital
  • Jochen Weber Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Catarina Barata Institute for Systems and Robotics; Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon
  • Elizabeth G. Berry Oregon Health & Science University
  • Hung Q. Doan The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Ashfaq A. Marghoob Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Elizabeth V. Seiverling Maine Medical Center
  • Shelly Sinclair Davidson College
  • Jennifer A. Stein New York University School of Medicine
  • Elizabeth R. Stoos Oregon Health & Science University
  • Martin G. Tolsgaard Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation; Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet
  • Maya Wolfensperger University Hospital of Zürich, University of Zürich
  • Ralph P. Braun University Hospital of Zürich, University of Zürich
  • Kelly C. Nelson The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Keywords:

dermoscopy education, image interpretation education, pattern recognition, educational theory, container model

Abstract

Introduction: Efficient interpretation of dermoscopic images relies on pattern recognition, and the development of expert-level proficiency typically requires extensive training and years of practice. While traditional methods of transferring knowledge have proven effective, technological advances may significantly improve upon these strategies and better equip dermoscopy learners with the pattern recognition skills required for real-world practice.

Objectives: A narrative review of the literature was performed to explore emerging directions in medical image interpretation education that may enhance dermoscopy education. This article represents the first of a two-part review series on this topic.

Methods: To promote innovation in dermoscopy education, the International Skin Imaging Collaboration (ISIC)assembled a 12-member Education Working Group that comprises international dermoscopy experts and educational scientists. Based on a preliminary literature review and their experiences as educators, the group developed and refined a list of innovative approaches through multiple rounds of discussion and feedback. For each approach, literature searches were performed for relevant articles.

Results: Through a consensus-based approach, the group identified a number of emerging directions in image interpretation education. The following theory-based approaches will be discussed in this first part: whole-task learning, microlearning, perceptual learning, and adaptive learning.

Conclusions: Compared to traditional methods, these theory-based approaches may enhance dermoscopy education by making learning more engaging and interactive and reducing the amount of time required to develop expert-level pattern recognition skills. Further exploration is needed to determine how these approaches can be seamlessly and successfully integrated to optimize dermoscopy education.

Author Biographies

Tiffaney Tran, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Department of Dermatology

Niels K. Ternov, Herlev Hospital

Department of Plastic Surgery

Jochen Weber, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dermatology Service

Elizabeth G. Berry, Oregon Health & Science University

Department of Dermatology

Hung Q. Doan, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Department of Dermatology

Ashfaq A. Marghoob, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Dermatology Service

Elizabeth V. Seiverling, Maine Medical Center

Division of Dermatology

Shelly Sinclair, Davidson College

Department of Biology

Jennifer A. Stein, New York University School of Medicine

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology

Elizabeth R. Stoos, Oregon Health & Science University

Department of Dermatology

Martin G. Tolsgaard, Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation; Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet

Department of Obstetrics

Maya Wolfensperger, University Hospital of Zürich, University of Zürich

Department of Dermatology

Ralph P. Braun, University Hospital of Zürich, University of Zürich

Department of Dermatology

Kelly C. Nelson, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Department of Dermatology

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Published

2022-10-31

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Review

How to Cite

1.
Theory-Based Approaches to Support Dermoscopic Image Interpretation Education: A Review of the Literature. Dermatol Pract Concept [Internet]. 2022 Oct. 31 [cited 2024 May 19];12(4):e2022188. Available from: https://dpcj.org/index.php/dpc/article/view/2242

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