Is There More Than One Road to Nevus-Associated Melanoma?

Is There More Than One Road to Nevus-Associated Melanoma?

Authors

  • Roberta Vezzoni Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Claudio Conforti Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Silvia Vichi Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Roberta Giuffrida Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
  • Chiara Retrosi Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Giovanni Magaton-Rizzi Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Nicola di Meo Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Maria Antonietta Pizzichetta Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste & Division of Oncology B, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy
  • Iris Zalaudek Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Keywords:

nevus-associated melanoma, melanoma, melanogenesis, dermoscopy

Abstract

The association of melanoma with a preexisting nevus is still a debated subject. Histopathological data support an associated nevus in approximately 30% of all excised melanomas. The annual risk of an individual melanocytic nevus becoming malignant is extremely low and has been estimated to be approximately 0.0005% (or less than 1 in 200,000) before the age of 40 years, to 0.003% (1 in 33,000) in patients older than 60 years. Current understanding, based on the noticeable, small, truly congenital nevi and nevi acquired early in life, is that the first develops before puberty, presents with a dermoscopic globular pattern, and persists for the lifetime, becoming later a dermal nevus in the adult. In contrast, acquired melanocytic nevi develop mostly at puberty and usually undergo spontaneous involution after the fifth decade of life. The purpose of this review is to analyze the data of the literature and to propose, on the basis of epidemiological and clinical-dermoscopic characteristics, a new model of melanogenesis of nevus-associated melanoma.

Author Biographies

Roberta Vezzoni, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

Claudio Conforti, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, Trieste, Italy

Silvia Vichi, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

Roberta Giuffrida, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.

Chiara Retrosi, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

Giovanni Magaton-Rizzi, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

Nicola di Meo, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

Maria Antonietta Pizzichetta, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste & Division of Oncology B, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy

Division of Oncology B, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy

Iris Zalaudek, Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Maggiore, University of Trieste, Italy

Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital of Trieste, University of Trieste, Piazza dell’Ospitale 1, 34125, Trieste (TS), Italy

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Published

2020-04-03

Issue

Section

Review

How to Cite

1.
Is There More Than One Road to Nevus-Associated Melanoma?. Dermatol Pract Concept [Internet]. 2020 Apr. 3 [cited 2024 May 19];10(2):e2020028. Available from: https://dpcj.org/index.php/dpc/article/view/dermatol-pract-concept-articleid-dp1002a28

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